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Our Emperor Signed no Treaty... :iconnikosboukouvalas:NikosBoukouvalas 45 23 Bad memories... :iconnikosboukouvalas:NikosBoukouvalas 12 17 Chlodvig and Theodosius (for Akitku) :iconnikosboukouvalas:NikosBoukouvalas 52 23 Portrait of Bohemond :iconnikosboukouvalas:NikosBoukouvalas 50 26 First Commission :iconnikosboukouvalas:NikosBoukouvalas 37 24 Valour of the Archontopouloi :iconnikosboukouvalas:NikosBoukouvalas 46 3 Doodle: Stavridis Face :iconnikosboukouvalas:NikosBoukouvalas 12 5 Quoting the Alexiad. :iconnikosboukouvalas:NikosBoukouvalas 36 30 WIP: Remembering past glories :iconnikosboukouvalas:NikosBoukouvalas 19 3 Patriarch Sergios of Constantinople meme :iconnikosboukouvalas:NikosBoukouvalas 21 10 Phokas Meme :iconnikosboukouvalas:NikosBoukouvalas 20 6 Tales of the White Death 2 :iconnikosboukouvalas:NikosBoukouvalas 12 6 Who are you supporting for the elections? :iconnikosboukouvalas:NikosBoukouvalas 35 22 Tabour the Dwarf Barbarian :iconnikosboukouvalas:NikosBoukouvalas 7 4 Tales of the White Death :iconnikosboukouvalas:NikosBoukouvalas 10 7 Inn Scene 3 :iconnikosboukouvalas:NikosBoukouvalas 0 1

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Our Emperor Signed no Treaty...
Tomorrow will be 25th of March, which commemorates the Greek War of Independence of 1821, when Greek Irregulars, comprised of Klephts (Greek equivalent of Hajduks) and Armatoloi (Greek Militia formed my the Ottomans to counter the Klephts) successfully rebelled against the Ottoman yoke and formed the first Greek State of Modern History. The sketch is inspired by a story narrated by Theodore Kolokotronis, one of the chieftains of the Revolution in his memoirs:

During a time when things looked particularly bleak for the Revolution, Theodore Kolokotronis asked the British Admiral Hamilton's advice on what the best course of action would be. Hamilton responded (quite truthfully) that the most prudent thing to do would be to negotiate the Greek surrender with Great Britain guaranteeing for their lives.

"That can never be" Theodore responded "We've already pledged Freedom or Death! Our Basileus was slain, he signed no treaty!
Ever since his Guard was always at War with the Turks and two forts remained forever indomitable"

Hamilton was baffled by this statement. What Basileus, what King? The one who fell in battle 400 years ago?
"What Royal Guard, what forts are you talking about?" he asked.

Theodore responded "The Guard of our Basileus are those they call Klephts, the forts are Mani and Souli and the mountains"
Then Hamilton spoke no more... 


Concerning the figures appearing here:

Top Right: Constantine "Dragases" XI Palaiologos:  The Last Byzantine and by extension Roman Emperor. A skilled and energetic ruler, he did his best to restore his Empire, including launching a successful campaign against the Latin Duchy of Athens. However his achievements were nullified by the Aggression of the Turks and the Indifference of the West. The deaths of both his first and second wife, convinced the people that he was "born under an unlucky star". Considering his final fate it is not unlikely... During the final Siege of Constantinople, Patriarch Athanasius II and Giovanni Justiniani tried to convince him to leave the City, but he refused: "How can I abandon my people? What will the world think of me? I beg of you friends, don't ask me such a thing again but say only "No Lord! Do not leave us!" I will never leave you! I have decided to die here with you..."

Top Left: Krokodeilos Kladas: A Byzantine Greek of the noble house Kladas. During the Ottoman–Venetian War of 1463–1479 he rebelled against the Turks and fought on the Venetians' side, hoping to establish a Greek State in Mani. Sultan Mehmed II tried to win him back, offering him the rich valley of Elos, but Kladas refused stating: "I only have interest in land liberated, not enslaved". In the end the Venetians signed a treaty which included a full pardon for Kladas, but he refused to stop figting, which earned him the (astronomical for the time) bounty of 10.000 gold ducats. He managed to defeat a superior Ottoman army in 1481 but could not win a war of attrition on his own. He was captured in battle in 1490 and flayed alive.

Bottom Left: Dionysios the Philosopher: A Greek Metropolitan Bishop, well learned in medicine, philosophy, philology, logic, astronomy, and poetry. He led two anti-Ottoman revolts, one in 1600 and the other in 1611 when he was captured in battle. When asked the motives of his rebellions he responded: "I rebelled to rid the people of your tyranny and torments!" Like Kladas before him, he was flayed alive. His skin was filled with hay and was paraded around the countryside, rebuked as the "skylosophos" (a pun between "philosopher" and the Greek word "skylos" meaning "dog").

Bottom Right: Theodore Kolokotronis, "the Old man of Morea": One of the most successful and popular Chieftains of the Revolution of 1821 and also the most recognizable, thanks to his cuirassier helmet (which he obtained during his service in the then British-occupied isle of Zakynthos). He was also illiterate until the twilight of his life, when he learned to write in order to complete his memoirs. Perhaps one of my favorite quotes of him was after the Revolution, when his political opponents managed to sentence him to death (he received a pardon by King Otto):

The Old Man crossed himself, evoking the name of the Lord, but more in puzzlement than fear. Within minutes he was surrounded by people from the crowd seeking to comfort him, but he seemed to be the one doing the comforting: Offering tobacco from his snuff box to anyone interested and saying: "I didn't fear Death then (during the Revolution), I do not fear it now..." A man from the crowd broke out in tears, yelling "They are killing you unjustly, my general!" to which Kolokotronis replied "Is that the cause of your grief? Better they kill me unjustly than justly..."
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Akitku's part of our art trade! I've been waiting for this and it really delivered! Thanks akitku
  Looking behind, looking forward by akitku
I have little time for reading as of late and yet my list of books I wish to read is ever-growing.
John Skylitzes' "Synopsis of Histories", Michael Psellos' "Chronography", St. Maximus the Confessor's "Chapters on Love" are waiting on my shelf, while Henryk Sienkiewicz's "With Fire and Sword" and Thomas Aquinas' "Summa Theologica" will have to wait but are not getting away from me.

And of course there is Tolkien. Having finished "The Lord of The Rings" and "Silmarillion", I thought "Unfinished Tales" had to be next in line, when I came up on this part from "The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien" and I decided I just NEED to read this before anything else:

"Myths, Lewis told Tolkien, were "lies and therefore worthless, even though breathed through silver."

"No," Tolkien replied. "Far from being lies they were the best way sometimes the only way of conveying truths that would otherwise remain inexpressible. The myths woven by us, though they contain error, reflect a splintered fragment of the true light, the eternal truth that is with God. Myths may be misguided, but they steer however shakily toward the true harbor, whereas materialistic "progress" leads only to the abyss and the power of evil.

"In expounding this belief in the inherent truth of mythology," wrote Tolkien's biographer, Humphrey Carpenter, "Tolkien had laid bare the center of his philosophy as a writer, the creed that is at the heart of The Silmarillion." It is also the creed at the heart of all his other work. His short novel, Tree and Leaf, is essentially an allegory on the concept of true myth, and his poem, "Mythopoeia," is an exposition in verse of the same concept.

Building on this philosophy of myth, Tolkien explained to Lewis that the story of Christ was the true myth at the very heart of history and at the very root of reality. Whereas the pagan myths were manifestations of God expressing Himself through the minds of poets, using the images of their "mythopoeia" to reveal fragments of His eternal truth, the true myth of Christ was a manifestation of God expressing Himself through Himself, with Himself, and in Himself. God, in the Incarnation, had revealed Himself as the ultimate poet who was creating reality, the true poem or true myth, in His own image. Thus, in a divinely inspired paradox, myth was revealed as the ultimate realism."
Bad memories...
When you are like: "I need to get this page over with. No going overboard with petty details"... I hate myself sometimes...

Bardas arrives at Koron, the Fortress-Capital of the theme of Cappadocia but has some hesitations going in.
I will probably need a "flashback" style panel frame, so if anyone has anything to suggest I am all ears.
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Chlodvig and Theodosius (for Akitku)
Art Trade for akitku
Her characters Theodosius and Chlodvig before the Chalke Gate. They are from her story "A tale of Byzantium and Persia", which I honestly hope we get to see finished one day because the premise is rather interesting. It takes time during the Byzantine-Persian war of 572–591), when queer things begin to happen: On both sides of the border cattle began to die. Strange creatures roamed the land. Soon after people began disappearing. Roman and Persian, civilian and soldier, all would disappear at the hands of an unknown culprit. From deep within each empire a detective was sent to deal with the mysterious threat. A detective specializing in the supernatural.

Chlodvig is a Frankish mercenary who serves as a hekatontarchos (centurion) in the East Roman Army (the magister militium at the time is Maurice, the future emperor).
Theodosios is a young Byzantine and the recently hired notarius (secretary) for the Merarch (division).
They form an unlikely friendship which will last for years.

So i finished it. Chlodvig came out as far prettier than I originally intended. Never mind. I enjoyed drawing his long viking-ish hair which is more than I can say for Theodosius whose hairstyle was a pain to capture. I have to say though, that it was somehow refreshing to draw these particular characters. I feel more motivated now to do my own comic.

I hope you like it Akitku and I am patiently waiting for your end of the Art Trade. 
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Portrait of Bohemond
Art trade for Theophilia  : Anna Komnene writes a rather detailed description of the Norman Prince Bohemond saying among else that "he was unlike anything seen in the land of the Romans, be he either barbarian or Hellen (fancy word for Greek) for he was a marvel for the eyes to behold... built in conformity with the canon of Polycleitus."

Some would say that she was merely trying to give an accurate portrayal (being the first female historian of the Western world and all), while others say that by exalting his arch enemy she was just honoring her father Alexios. The rest of us think she had a crush on him. Typical of the girl to go after the bad barbarian... No, I disagree! 

Let us hope Alexios did not notice because he and Bohemond had a strained relationship at best: Bohemond and his father, Robert Guiscard "the Fox" invaded Greece in 1081 and captured much of it, pillaging their way as far as Kastoria. After Guiscard passed away, Alexios Komnenos was able to outwit and finally defeat Bohemond.
But he would meet him again, as the later participated in the First Crusade: Alexios offered to escort the Crusaders through Greece and Anatolia on the condition that the Crusaders would return to him any former Byzantine cities that they would recapture from he Turks. Everything was going well, until Bohemond tricked Alexios into believing that the Crusaders had been slaughtered and the Crusaders into believing that Alexios had abandoned them. He thus convinced them that their oaths to "the treacherous Greek" were null and that he should keep the city of Antioch for himself... which he did.

He later tried to invade Greece again but Alexios defeated him and forced him into vassalage. He died a broken man in 1111 A.D.

The heraldry on the shield is the actual personal cat of arms of Bohemond from Salle des Croisades:

wappenwiki.org/index.php/File:…

On another note I tried some new filters in Photoshop and I think it restores the original colors pretty nicely, as well as hiding the paper texture. What do you think?
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I have little time for reading as of late and yet my list of books I wish to read is ever-growing.
John Skylitzes' "Synopsis of Histories", Michael Psellos' "Chronography", St. Maximus the Confessor's "Chapters on Love" are waiting on my shelf, while Henryk Sienkiewicz's "With Fire and Sword" and Thomas Aquinas' "Summa Theologica" will have to wait but are not getting away from me.

And of course there is Tolkien. Having finished "The Lord of The Rings" and "Silmarillion", I thought "Unfinished Tales" had to be next in line, when I came up on this part from "The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien" and I decided I just NEED to read this before anything else:

"Myths, Lewis told Tolkien, were "lies and therefore worthless, even though breathed through silver."

"No," Tolkien replied. "Far from being lies they were the best way sometimes the only way of conveying truths that would otherwise remain inexpressible. The myths woven by us, though they contain error, reflect a splintered fragment of the true light, the eternal truth that is with God. Myths may be misguided, but they steer however shakily toward the true harbor, whereas materialistic "progress" leads only to the abyss and the power of evil.

"In expounding this belief in the inherent truth of mythology," wrote Tolkien's biographer, Humphrey Carpenter, "Tolkien had laid bare the center of his philosophy as a writer, the creed that is at the heart of The Silmarillion." It is also the creed at the heart of all his other work. His short novel, Tree and Leaf, is essentially an allegory on the concept of true myth, and his poem, "Mythopoeia," is an exposition in verse of the same concept.

Building on this philosophy of myth, Tolkien explained to Lewis that the story of Christ was the true myth at the very heart of history and at the very root of reality. Whereas the pagan myths were manifestations of God expressing Himself through the minds of poets, using the images of their "mythopoeia" to reveal fragments of His eternal truth, the true myth of Christ was a manifestation of God expressing Himself through Himself, with Himself, and in Himself. God, in the Incarnation, had revealed Himself as the ultimate poet who was creating reality, the true poem or true myth, in His own image. Thus, in a divinely inspired paradox, myth was revealed as the ultimate realism."

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:icontheophilia:
Theophilia Featured By Owner 6 days ago  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
A belated Happy Birthday to you! :cake: I had meant to send you this for your birthday, but then everytime I got on dA I forgot about it. :XD: So here's some food for your soul: www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHpOiX…

Awww, man those acoustics!!! :iconiloveitplz:
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:iconnikosboukouvalas:
NikosBoukouvalas Featured By Owner 5 days ago
Thank you very much! :D
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:icontheophilia:
Theophilia Featured By Owner 4 days ago  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
You're very welcome! :D
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:iconchris-the-sword:
chris-the-sword Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2017  Student Traditional Artist
happy birthday!
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:iconnikosboukouvalas:
NikosBoukouvalas Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2017
Thanks friend :D
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:iconchris-the-sword:
chris-the-sword Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2017  Student Traditional Artist
you're welcome!

keep making epic art!
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:iconzaphkiellane:
Zaphkiellane Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Happy birthday, I'm really loving your artwork and looking forward to seeing more. I hope you have a productive year. 
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:iconnikosboukouvalas:
NikosBoukouvalas Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2017
Thank you very much! It means a lot that you like work! Take care!
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:iconcharcoalfeather:
charcoalfeather Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Happy birthday!
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:iconnikosboukouvalas:
NikosBoukouvalas Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2017
Thanks friend!
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